The New York Times Takes Legal Action Against OpenAI and Microsoft Over Alleged Copyright Infringement

The New York Times Takes Legal Action Against OpenAI and Microsoft Over Alleged Copyright Infringement | Enterprise Wired

Share Post:

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Reddit

Credit- AP

A legal battle has erupted between The New York Times and tech giants OpenAI and Microsoft, as the renowned news outlet accuses the companies of copyright infringement. The lawsuit contends that these tech entities unlawfully utilized millions of Times articles to train AI models, including ChatGPT, creating technology that directly competes with the Times’ services.

An Ongoing Legal Struggle

This lawsuit marks the latest in a series of legal actions aiming to curb the widespread scraping of online content to train large language AI models without compensating content creators. Concerns loom among writers, journalists, and creatives who fear that AI will replicate their work without due acknowledgment or payment.

The Times’ complaint, distinctive for its targeting of OpenAI and Microsoft, alleges that the companies heavily relied on Times’ content, emphasizing it within their AI models. Microsoft’s substantial investment in OpenAI and its position on the board further intensify the legal conflict.

The Allegations

In their filed complaint, The Times emphasized its commitment to informing subscribers, raising concerns about the unlawful use of their content by OpenAI and Microsoft. The Times asserts that the companies took advantage of its journalistic investment without permission or compensation, jeopardizing the Times’ ability to provide its service.

OpenAI responded, expressing surprise and disappointment, highlighting their willingness to collaborate with publishers for mutual benefit. Microsoft, however, remained silent regarding the lawsuit.

The Continuing Dispute

Despite efforts to negotiate compensation, The Times alleges that both companies deemed their use of Times’ content as “fair use,” a claim vehemently refuted by the news outlet. The Times contends that AI models like ChatGPT and Microsoft’s Bing chatbot infringe on their content, providing similar services without proper compensation.

New York Times sues OpenAI and Microsoft for copyright infringement

Industry Pushback Against AI

The Times’ legal pursuit aligns with a broader resistance from leading newsrooms like CNN, who deployed measures to block OpenAI’s web crawlers from accessing their content. Similar lawsuits involving prominent personalities and fiction writers have surfaced, reflecting a collective concern about AI’s use of copyrighted materials without consent.

The Potential Implications

The Times lawsuit seeks substantial damages, without specifying an exact amount, and demands a permanent injunction against further infringement. Legal experts anticipate this case to potentially set a precedent, as the legality of using copyrighted material to train AI models remains an unsettled matter within the legal landscape.

The Battle for Compensation and Control

The clash between traditional media and burgeoning AI technologies epitomizes the struggle for fair compensation and acknowledgment in the evolving digital landscape. As the legal confrontation unfolds, it embodies the broader quest for equitable treatment of copyrighted content in the era of rapidly advancing artificial intelligence.

Curious to learn more? Explore our articles on Enterprise Wired

Subscribe

RELATED ARTICLES

Elon Musk Triumphs in Critical Tesla Pay Package Vote

Elon Musk Triumphs in Critical Tesla Pay Package Vote

Source – Arab News Small Investors Rally Behind CEO Despite Institutional Opposition Elon Musk celebrated a significant victory on Thursday…
Life360 Makes Public Debut on Nasdaq

Life360 Makes Public Debut on Nasdaq

Source – AFR Tech Firm Enters Public Market Life360, Inc., a technology company specializing in location tracking services for families,…
Five Below CEO Warns of Lingering Effects of Inflation

Five Below CEO Warns of Lingering Effects of Inflation

Source – NBC New York Challenges for Consumers Joel Anderson, CEO of discount retailer Five Below, expressed concerns about the…
FDA Rescinds Marketing Denial Orders for Juul Products

FDA Rescinds Marketing Denial Orders for Juul Products

Source – Reuters Reversal of Marketing Denial Orders The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on Thursday that it…